Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoUpper Coppice Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

Introduction

Built in 1736 by George Ibbotson, the Wheel was used initially for cutlery grinding and later wire drawing. By 1905 the Wheel was out of use.

The small mill dam is silted and overgrown, with a stream flowing through. Few traces of the buildings remain. Water can usually be seen cascading into the wheel pit and then flows directly into the head goit of Second Coppice Wheel.

The Upper Coppice weir is immediately below the Grade II listed Packhorse Bridge, which dates from about 1775 and carried the packhorse track from Crosspool to Stannington.

Image of The small Upper Coppice mill dam is silted and overgrown, with a stream flowing through

The small Upper Coppice mill dam is silted and overgrown, with a stream flowing through. Photo: Sue Shaw April 2015.

HISTORY (C. 1730s–1900s)

Main trades: Cutlery grinding, wire drawing.

Upper Coppice Wheel was built in 1736 by George Ibbotson after he had leased the land from the Duke of Norfolk for 21 years. The next recorded lease was to Thomas Spooner in 1761 and the mill stayed in the hands of the Spooner Family for the next 33 years. In 1794 the wheel pit was recorded as having a 12 ft (c. 3.6 m) fall of water, running four trows with six people employed.

There was extensive renovation work, including a new waterwheel, in the early 19th century. The Duke of Norfolk Estates remained the owners until 1854 when Sheffield Waterworks Company acquired all of the Coppice Wheels, and at which time the Upper Coppice was leased as a wire mill to Samuel Fox & William Rose. The mill was out of use by 1905.


Other Mills
RVCG website