Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoThird Coppice Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

What's there now?

The weir uses a natural waterfall raised by a single course of stone blocks stapled together. Look out for the large metal straps holding the stone blocks together along the top.

The head goit is very short, now with a modern shuttle gate on the entry. The mill dam still holds water, but is silted and partially overgrown. The overflow (now crossed by stepping stones built by the RVCG in 2001) is only a few metres from the head goit entry.

It is hard to believe that there was once an extensive complex of buildings here, as the site is now largely obscured by landslip. The bottom of the wheel pit was below the level of the river in order to increase the fall of water, thereby allowing a larger waterwheel to be used – in 1794 the wheel pit was recorded as having a fall of 18 ft 4 in (c. 5.6 m).

The long tail-goit (c. 150 m), which in the lower part is separated from the river by a low stone wall (now broken in places), allowed the fall in the river to match the water level in the tail goit and avoid water backing up the channel.

Image of The Third Coppice weir uses a natural waterfall raised by a single course of stone blocks stapled together.

The Third Coppice weir uses a natural waterfall raised by a single course of stone blocks stapled together. Photo: Roger Kite, February 2011


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