Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoThird Coppice Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

Introduction

First leased to John Hoyland & Joseph Spooner in 1758, this site was initially used for cutlery grinding and later converted to a paper mill. By 1905 the site was empty.

The wide Third Coppice weir is one of the most attractive features of the Rivelin Valley. It uses a natural waterfall which has been raised by a single course of stone blocks stapled together. It can be crossed (with care) when water levels are sufficiently low.

The mill dam still holds water, but is silted and partially overgrown. It is hard to believe that there was once an extensive complex of buildings here, as the site is now largely obscured by landslip.

Image of The forebay at the end of the Third Coppice mill dam.

The forebay at the end of the Third Coppice mill dam. Photo Sue Shaw, May 2016.

HISTORY (C. 1750s–1900s)

Also known as: Rivelin Paper Mill.

Main trades: Cutlery grinding; paper mill; rolling house.

The first lease for Third Coppice Wheel was in 1758 to John Hoyland & Joseph Spooner for 21 years. By 1794, the lease had passed to William Creswick who employed four men at four cutlers’ trows, but by 1814, when it was converted to a paper mill, there were 13 trows.

Paper-making (from rags) at this mill required good clean water, which was brought across from the Black Brook (on the opposite side of the river) in an aqueduct from just above the Black Brook waterfall.

In 1852 the property comprised one paper mill, two drying houses, a rope shed, a long rolling house, stables and cowshed, and a dwelling, along with several other buildings. Like Frank Wheel (next downstream), the last known lease for this property was to Horatio & Thomas Marsden in 1889. By 1905 both sites were described as empty.

Image Third Coppice Wheel (Rivelin Paper Mill) with its associated buildings and distinctive tall chimney (1876).

Third Coppice Wheel (Rivelin Paper Mill) with its associated buildings and distinctive tall chimney (1876). Sheffield City Council, Libraries Archives and Information: www.picturesheffield.co.uk Image s10466.

Image Third Coppice Wheel (Rivelin Paper Mill) with its associated buildings and distinctive tall chimney (1876).

Third Coppice Wheel (Rivelin Paper Mill) with its associated buildings and distinctive tall chimney (1876). Sheffield City Council, Libraries Archives and Information: www.picturesheffield.co.uk Image s10466.

King Edward VII Hospital

After King Edward VII died in 1910, the people of Sheffield donated £18,000 towards a memorial and it was decided to build a hospital for disabled children with the funds. The City Council provided extra cash and the Duke of Norfolk donated the land for the new hospital. The hospital, comprising 120–130 beds together with an operating theatre, kitchens and nurses quarters, received its first patients in 1916. The Hospital was known as the King Edward VII Hospital for Crippled Children, as reflected on an early map of the site. Initially the patients were children with tubercular joints and rickets but as the years passed the type of condition treated was extended to include congenital deformities and poliomyelitis. From 1922 patients were also admitted from outside Sheffield. In 1939 it was decided to admit adult patients suffering from surgical tuberculosis.

In 1944, towards the end of the Second World War, beds were made available for wounded officers and both children and the officers seemed to benefit from each other’s company. Also in that year the Hospital was recognised as a nurses’ training hospital. In 1948, following the establishment of the National Health Service, the Hospital was renamed the King Edward VII Orthopaedic Hospital and additional facilities were introduced, including two new ward blocks, bedrooms for members of staff, and a workshop. A hydrotherapy pool was added in 1956. By then the hospital compared favourably with almost any in the Country.

The Hospital was closed in 1992 and converted for residential use after planning permission was granted in 1997. The hospital building, the entrance lodge, boiler house and one of the outbuildings are all Grade II listed.


Other Mills
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