Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield Logo Roscoe Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin in Sheffield

What's there now

Roscoe weir is still in good condition and is particularly unusual: the long, dressed stone slope has three changes of gradient, and there are two top kerbs – the upper one is a double-arc which is unique in Sheffield, apparently built to help protect the second kerb by causing silt to be deposited further upstream.

Some iron-work survives on top of the large stone slabs of the head-goit inlet. The short head goit now feeds into a stream that flows along the bottom of the hillslope at the edge of the now dry and wooded mill dam and to the river via the wheel pit/tail goit and the overflow.

A capstan and roller are mounted on the massive stone blocks of the overflow (near Roscoe Bridge). A small stream passes through the overflow, under the path and out into the river through a rectangular culvert.

Remains of the building can still be seen as well as the wheel pit arch and outfall from the pit into the tail goit (culverted underground). A curved groove in the wall of the wheel pit gives some idea of the size of the wheel.

The tail goit is culverted until about 50 m below the wheel pit, and then runs along the base of the hill slope and into the river close to the New Dam weir.

The unusual Roscoe weir, with its double-arc top kerb and long slope. Photo: Sue Shaw, May 2014.

The unusual Roscoe weir, with its double-arc top kerb and long slope. Photo: Sue Shaw, May 2014.

Remains of shuttle ironwork on the inlet to the Roscoe head goit. Stones were dislodged by a fallen tree. Photo: Sue Shaw, July 2014

Remains of shuttle ironwork on the inlet to the Roscoe head goit. Stones were dislodged by a fallen tree. Photo: Sue Shaw, July 2014

Massive stone blocks beside the path are the remains of the overflow for Roscoe mill dam. Photo: Sue Shaw, May 2014.

Massive stone blocks beside the path are the remains of the overflow for Roscoe mill dam. Photo: Sue Shaw, May 2014.

Capstan and roller of the overflow shuttle are mounted on the massive stone blocks of the Roscoe mill dam overflow. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015

Capstan and roller of the overflow shuttle are mounted on the massive stone blocks of the Roscoe mill dam overflow. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015

A small stream flows through the Roscoe mill dam overflow. Capstan and roller of the overflow shuttle can be seen on the stone above. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

A small stream flows through the Roscoe mill dam overflow. Capstan and roller of the overflow shuttle can be seen on the stone above. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

Water from the Roscoe mill dam overflow passes under the path and out into the river through a rectangular culvert. Photo: Sue Shaw, January 2015.

Water from the Roscoe mill dam overflow passes under the path and out into the river through a rectangular culvert. Photo: Sue Shaw, January 2015.

The site of Roscoe Wheel, including the remains of the wheel-pit and arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

The site of Roscoe Wheel, including the remains of the wheel-pit and arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

North-east end of Roscoe mill dam, showing remains of the wheel pit arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

North-east end of Roscoe mill dam, showing remains of the wheel pit arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

Remains of Roscoe wheel pit and arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, April 2014.

Remains of Roscoe wheel pit and arch. Photo: Sue Shaw, April 2014.

Looking down into Roscoe wheel pit – the small archway at the rear marks the entry to the tail goit culvert. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

Looking down into Roscoe wheel pit – the small archway at the rear marks the entry to the tail goit culvert. Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

The back wall of Roscoe Wheel was built into the bank – the remains of the stonework are still visible. The rectangular holes probably held the beams that supported the upper floor (which was reached via outside steps). Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

The back wall of Roscoe Wheel was built into the bank – the remains of the stonework are still visible. The rectangular holes probably held the beams that supported the upper floor (which was reached via outside steps). Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

Part of the back wall of the Roscoe cottages, which were built into the bank. The stonework was exposed in 2016. Photo: Sue Shaw, September 2016.

Part of the back wall of the Roscoe cottages, which were built into the bank. The stonework was exposed in 2016. Photo: Sue Shaw, September 2016.

Part of the back wall of the Roscoe cottages, which were built into the bank. The stonework was exposed in 2016. Photo: Sue Shaw, September 2016.

Part of the back wall of the Roscoe cottages, which were built into the bank. The stonework was exposed in 2016. Photo: Sue Shaw, September 2016.

Roscoe tail goit. Photo: Sue Shaw, June 2015.

Roscoe tail goit. Photo: Sue Shaw, June 2015.

Roscoe tail goit outflows into the river just upstream of the New Dam/Spooners weir (site of Rivelin Chair Sculpture). Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.

Roscoe tail goit outflows into the river just upstream of the New Dam/Spooners weir (site of Rivelin Chair Sculpture). Photo: Sue Shaw, March 2015.


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