Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoLittle London Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

Introduction

Little London is one of the smallest sites in the valley, and one of the later Wheels in the valley to be built. It was erected as a cutler’s Wheel in around 1752, and is thought to have been used for cutlery and file grinding until it was demolished in 1911.

Trees now grow in the former mill dam, which is largely dry apart from a stream running through from the head goit entry (at the weir) to the overflow.

The well-preserved overflow is marked by a small bridge but the stonework and remains of the footings are wheel pit are hard to make out amongst the undergrowth.

Little London Wheel.

Little London Wheel.

HISTORY (1752–1910s)

Main trades: Cutlery and file grinding.

Little London Wheel has one of the most straight-forward histories in the valley. In 1752 Robert Greaves leased part of the stream for 21 years with an annual rent of £1 and a liberty to erect a cutler’s Wheel. In 1794 Thomas Spooner was running four trows and employing six men.

Drawing by A. Chattle.

Drawing by A. Chattle.

Holme Head Weir and Little London building.

Holme Head Weir and LL building.

The Wheel was in ruins by 1903 and was let for a nominal sum to Samuel Dawson (a file grinder) for him to repair. Dawson was evidently still there in 1905 but the Wheel was recorded as empty by 1907 and demolished in 1911.

Picture of Mr Dawson.

Picture of Mr Dawson.


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