Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoHollins Bridge Mill

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

What's there now?

The area was landscaped in the 1950s and little now remains of this mill and its original mill dam. The long weir across the river just upstream of Hollins Bridge was built in the early 1900s when the course of the river was altered (see History tab), and is one of the longest in the valley. The water level could be raised further by inserting wooden boards into metal cleats on the top of the weir – remains of four of these cleats can still be seen. The large stone structure on the north bank beside the weir is probably the remains of the intake / shuttle for the wheel pit.

The Long Weir.

The Long Weir.

The remains of the tail goit can still be seen under Hollins Bridge, joining the river on the downstream side of the bridge via a channel separated from the river by a series of stone slabs. This arrangement was needed to equalise the water levels in the tail goit and river to prevent water backing up the tail goit when river levels were high (which would prevent the waterwheel from turning). A similar stone wall can be seen on the tail goits at Holme Head Wheel and Third Coppice Wheel.

Remains of the tail goit.

Remains of the tail goit.

The RIVELIN VALLEY WATER PLAY area (see below) is on the south bank. The original Rivelin Valley Park, including the children’s playground on the site of the former Spooners mill dam and the paddling pools alongside the road, was created during the 1950s as part of the Festival of Britain. The paddling pools used water flowing in from the River Rivelin – the inlets can be seen just above the weir below the café. When the river level is low, the water inlets for the original paddling pools can be seen at the bottom of the wall just above the weir. The large ‘ruler’ (gauge board) fixed to the wall here is used by the Environment Agency to monitor water levels in the river.

Historical image of the paddling pools.

Image: Paddling Pools … u05220. The original Paddling pools were built in the 1950s as part of the Festival of Britain. Rivelin Park, Rivelin Valley Road, c. 1960s. Photo: Parks Department, Sheffield City Council. Sheffield City Council, Libraries Archives and Information: www.picturesheffield.co.uk Image u05220. http://www.picturesheffield.com/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;u05220&acti on=zoom&pos=3&id=40297&continueUrl=

Spooners playground

Spooners playground….u05221. Children's Playground, Rivelin Park, created for the Festival of Britain Scheme 1951. Date: 1953/08. Photo: H. Lovatt. Sheffield City Council, Libraries Archives and Information: www.picturesheffield.co.uk Image u05221.

In 2013, the paddling pools were fully refurbished by Sheffield City Council, and reopened as ‘Rivelin Valley Water Play’. The changes include a new toilet block, a new water filter system, improved access to the three large splash pads with anti-slip surfacing, a variety of water-play equipment, such as jets, sprinklers, bucket drops and water tables, and ramped access with handrails into the paddling pool. The improved facilities were partly funded by the ‘Aiming High for Disabled Children’ programme.

Rivelin Valley Water Play.

Rivelin Valley Water Play.


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