Rivelin Valley Conservation Group and Ruskin In Sheffield LogoFrank Wheel

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group

Introduction

Frank Wheel dates back to at least 1737, when the first lease was recorded. It was originally used for grinding cutlery but converted to a paper mill by 1854. From 1905 the site stood empty and most of the building was levelled.

The main sights here are the cascade of water at the weir and the trail running on a narrow path between the long, wide head goit and the river. Look out for ‘Frank’ the dinosaur tree, which lies across the water in the mill dam.

‘Frank’ the dinosaur tree

‘Frank’ the dinosaur tree

HISTORY (1730s–1900s)

Also known as: Coppey Nook, Coppy Wheel, Fourth Coppey Wheel, Frank Paper Mill, Nether

Main trades: Cutlery grinding; paper mill.

The first lease for Frank Wheel was in 1737, to Richard Marshall and Stephen Parker. Marshall extended it in 1756 and in 1782 it was recorded as having 11 trows, employing 14 men, and an 18 ft 10 in (5.7 m) fall of water. In 1852 the Wheel was still being used for cutlery grinding, but by 1854 it had been converted to a paper mill. The last known lease on the Wheel, for 14 years, was recorded in 1889 between Sheffield Corporation and Horatio & Thomas Marsden. It was empty by 1905 and most of the Wheel workshop building was subsequently levelled, leaving few remains.

This drawing by A. Chattle shows what the building was like in the mid-19th century.

This drawing by A. Chattle shows what the building was like in the mid-19th century.


Other Mills
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